Funeral Planning Guide and Checklist

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Funeral Planning Guide and Checklist

Planning a funeral can be an expensive process as well as one that is emotionally exhausting.

To try and make the process somewhat easier, ensure that you are prepared mentally and physically for the range of emotions that you may be filled with leading up to the funeral and during the event itself.

We know how painful losing a loved one is and the temptation to seclude yourself and  your emotions from the rest of your friends and family.

Ensure you have a close friend (that is not directly affected by the grief) with you during this funeral planning stage.

Their support and availability during this time may help you to observe things from a clearer perspective, they may be able to guide you through information that you may have been given.

You will more than likely be emotionally drained and may not be able to process your thoughts – therefore an extra support will be valuable at this time.

Make sure you have someone close with you that is not necessarily directly grieving – could be a friend, close work colleague that can support, help, look at things with fresh eyes as you are more likely to be emotionally draining, not processing thoughts properly.

We have organised this resource into three sections:

Pre funeral – what are the first steps? 

  • Choosing a funeral director and exploring what their role is within the process
  • Funeral costs, burial and cremation fees 
  • What is the process of embalming and cremation? 
  • Planning a funeral alone – without the help of a funeral director

Preparing for the funeral 

  • Selecting the venue and a date
  • Making arrangements for the day
  • Personalising the funeral 

The funeral day

  • The different stages of the day
  • Post funeral ceremonies

As mentioned in article on what needs to be done when someone dies, a funeral can only take place once a death has been registered, and a death must be registered within 5 days (8 days in Scotland).

When you register a death, the register will give you a death certificate and also a certificate for burial and cremation.

This is often referred to as the green certificate or form.

It simply gives authorisation for the body to be buried or for an application for cremation to be made, this should be given to your funeral director (if you plan to use one).

This guide article will provide you with useful information to help you plan the funeral of your loved one.

Given below is the table of content so you can directly hop onto the question you have in your mind.

Table of Content

Pre Funeral: First steps

Pre Funeral: Choosing a Funeral Director

Pre Funeral: Funeral Costs, burial and cremation fees

Preparing for the funeral

The funeral day

Conclusion

Pre funeral – what are the first steps?

Pre Funeral: Choosing a funeral director and exploring what their role

Pre Funeral: Funeral costs, burial and cremation fees

Preparing for the funeral

The funeral day

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